In Painting 24, one of the pilots prepares for the night in his Apollo-style sleeping bag tethered out of the way across the module. This painting may have been left in revision: a reviewer’s notes on the cover sheet (below) say to add pockets, armholes and a head restraint, but no head restraint is apparent. (the annotated onionskin sheet is mis-aligned on the painting but the intention of the notes is clear.)  In addition, the straps at the head end of the sleeping back do not align with the wall of the module, although those at the foot end do align, suggesting some degree of haste and imprecision in adding an otherwise reasonable background.

The photograph (below) of a McDonnell-Douglas engineer modelling a sleeping bag may have been used in this painting. The actual sleeping bag has the arm holes and pockets as specified on the onionskin annotations. Note also the very long straps being held by the engineer on the ladder and those curled at the foot of the sleeping bag. Those straps might have stretched the length of the pressurized module, allowing the man to attach them to opposite end cones if desired--unlike in Jacobe's painting.

McDonnell-Douglas engineer modelling the MOL sleeping bag. (NRO MOL Photograph 43. Photo credit: McDonnell Douglas and NRO.)

Undated photograph from early in MOL design, showing what might be sleep pods for two crewmen on the far wall of an impossibly spacious MOL habitat. Note also the non-traditional chair apparently intended to provide stability in weightlessness than support against gravity. For more information, see the discussion for painting 22. (Photo credit: USAF.)

Undated photograph from early in MOL design, showing what might be sleep pods for two crewmen on the far wall of an impossibly spacious MOL habitat. Note also the non-traditional chair apparently intended to provide stability in weightlessness than support against gravity. For more information, see the discussion for painting 22. (Photo credit: USAF.)